Professor Buzzkill History Podcast | History Myths and Misconceptions Buzzkilled!2020-12-01T08:17:27-05:00

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History Myths Buzzkilled

George Washington and the Development of the Cabinet

How and why did George Washington create the cabinet structure that he used in his Presidency? How did it help create new political norms and traditions in the early United States? What was its long-standing effect? Professor Lindsey Chervinsky explains all! Episode #395. --- Buzzkill Bookshelf Lindsay M. Chervinsky, The Cabinet: George Washington and the Creation of an American Institution The US Constitution never established a presidential cabinet―the delegates to the Constitutional Convention explicitly rejected the idea. So how did George Washington create one of the most powerful bodies in the federal government? On November 26, 1791, George Washington convened his department secretaries―Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, Henry Knox, and Edmund Randolph―for the first cabinet meeting. Why did he wait two and a half years into [...]

Gustav Stresmann – Man Crush Monday!

Professor Philip Nash explains his man-crush on Gustav Stresemann, the important German politician during the Weimar period. What do Stresemann's career and his hopes for Germany tell us about the strengths that can be found in nationalism? And we engage in some "what if Stresemann had lived" speculation. Would we have seen the rise of Hitler? Episode #394 --- Buzzkill Bookshelf Jonathan Wright, Gustav Stresemann: Weimar's Greatest Statesman Gustav Stresemann was the exceptional political figure of his time. His early death in 1929 has long been viewed as the beginning of the end for the Weimar Republic and the opening through which Hitler was able to come to power. His career was marked by many contradictions but also a pervading loyalty to the values of [...]

Rallies for “More History” at the Gettysburg Battlefield

Professor Scott Hancock from Gettysburg College joins us to explain the development of efforts to contextualize and historicize the Confederate Monuments at the Gettysburg National Military Park. The summer of 2020 saw a great deal of tension and confrontation during these presentations. Dr. Hancock explains how this helped the "We Want More History" movement. One of our best shows ever! Episode #393 Watch this space for more info about how to get #WeWantMoreHistory t-shirts and other merch! Coming Soon! Links mentioned in the episode: You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fg9nX67WxjI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4GBdviEFxk New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/28/arts/civil-war-monuments.html?action=click&module=Features&pgtype=Homepage​ PennLive.com for “Gettysburg Confederate Monuments to get new panels to offer more historical context.” https://www.pennlive.com/news/2020/08/gettysburg-confederate-monuments-to-get-new-panels-to-offer-more-historical-context.html Interview with Newsy: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1w9BBl1JOGoGRKU1W0t1shZo8odMDX5R5/view Panel discussion live-streamed with YDR.com on Confederate monuments at Gettysburg National Military Park: https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=286529159455702&ref=watch_permalink [...]

Forward and in High Heels: from Ginger Rogers to Ann Richards to Kamala Harris

It’s certainly been an exciting November here at the Buzzkill Institute and, more importantly, of course, here in the United States. Buzzkill employees have been working around the clock, trying to keep up with the pace of news and to produce shows that are relevant to current events. And, Americans as a whole have seen a dramatic and tense presidential election night, an uneasy and fraught few days while the ballot counts went on and on in various American states, and, most important of all, have tried to continue our lives with the spectre of a worsening COVID crisis scaring us to death. Last week, we had an interview with the excellent journalism historian, Dr. Teri Finneman, where she analyzed press portrayals of female politicians [...]

Georgian Texel Uprising and Hitler’s Revenge, April-May 1945

In the final days of World War II in Europe, Georgians serving in the Wehrmacht on Texel island off the Dutch coast rose up and slaughtered their German masters. Hitler ordered the island to be retaken and fighting continued for weeks, well after the war's end. The uprising had its origins in the bloody history of Georgia in the twentieth century, a history that saw the country move from German occupation, to three short years of independence, to Soviet rule after it was conquered by the Red Army in 1921. A bloody rebellion against the Soviets took place in 1924, but it remained under Russian Soviet rule. Thousands of Georgians served in the Soviet forces during World War II and among those who were captured, [...]

Eric Lee, Night of the Bayonets: The Texel Uprising and Hitler’s Revenge, April–May 1945

Eric Lee explores this fascinating but little known last battle of the Second World War: its origins, the incredible details of the battle and its ongoing legacy. In the final days of World War II in Europe, Georgians serving in the Wehrmacht on Texel island off the Dutch coast rose up and slaughtered their German masters. Hitler ordered the island to be retaken and fighting continued for weeks, well after the war's end. The uprising had its origins in the bloody history of Georgia in the twentieth century, a history that saw the country move from German occupation, to three short years of independence, to Soviet rule after it was conquered by the Red Army in 1921. A bloody rebellion against the Soviets took place [...]

The Press and Women Politicians from Victoria Woodhull to Kamala Harris

Professor Teri Finneman explains how the press has portrayed women politicians running for high office in the United State. From Victoria Woodhull in the 1870s to Kamala Harris in 2020, she enlightens us about how media discourse of women politicians has and hasn’t changed over this long period! Episode #390. --- Buzzkill Bookshelf Teri Finneman, Press Portrayals of Women Politicians, 1870s–2000s: From "Lunatic" Woodhull to "Polarizing" Recent history suggests the United States is within reach of its first woman president. This book examines the media experiences of women political pioneers who helped pave the way to the breaking of the glass ceiling. It analyzes newspaper treatment of four pioneering politicians between the 1870s and 2000s and explores how media discourse of women politicians has and [...]

Teri Finneman, Press Portrayals of Women Politicians, 1870s–2000s: From “Lunatic” Woodhull to “Polarizing”

Recent history suggests the United States is within reach of its first woman president. This book examines the media experiences of women political pioneers who helped pave the way to the breaking of the glass ceiling. It analyzes newspaper treatment of four pioneering politicians between the 1870s and 2000s and explores how media discourse of women politicians has and hasn’t changed over 150 years. The women featured are Victoria Woodhull, the first woman to run for president; Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress; Margaret Chase Smith, the first woman to receive a presidential nomination at a major party’s convention; and Sarah Palin, the first Republican woman vice presidential candidate. The social, political, and journalistic cultures of each woman’s era are also explored to [...]

Election Polling Errors in US History

The pollsters correctly predicted a Biden win in the 2020 Presidential election. But there was no Blue Wave, and Senate seats didn't flip, as many pollsters predicted. Polling prediction errors are common in American history. Professor W. Joseph Campbell explains why! Episode #389 --- Buzzkill Bookshelf W. Joseph Campbell, Lost in a Gallup: Polling Failure in U.S. Presidential Elections A sweeping look at the messy and contentious past of US presidential pre-election polls and why they aren’t as reliable as we think. Donald Trump’s unexpected victory in the 2016 U.S. presidential election brought sweeping criticism of election polls and poll-based statistical forecasts, which had signaled that Hillary Clinton would win the White House. Surprise ran deep in 2016, but it was not unprecedented. Lost in [...]

W. Joseph Campbell, Lost in a Gallup: Polling Failure in U.S. Presidential Elections

A sweeping look at the messy and contentious past of US presidential pre-election polls and why they aren’t as reliable as we think. Donald Trump’s unexpected victory in the 2016 U.S. presidential election brought sweeping criticism of election polls and poll-based statistical forecasts, which had signaled that Hillary Clinton would win the White House. Surprise ran deep in 2016, but it was not unprecedented. Lost in a Gallup examines in lively and engaging fashion the history of polling flops, epic upsets, unforeseen landslides, and exit poll fiascoes in American presidential elections. Drawing on archival collections and contemporaneous sources, W. Joseph Campbell presents insights on notable pollsters of the past, including George Gallup, Elmo Roper, Archibald Crossley, Warren Mitofsky, and Louis Harris. The story is one [...]

Native Americans in Film, 1941-1960

Professor Liza Black enlightens us about her new book, Picturing Indians: Native Americans in Film 1941-1960. She examines many misunderstandings and misconceptions about Native Americans working in the Golden Age of Hollywood. Episode #388 Get a copy of Picturing Indians at a 40% by going to https://blackli0.wixsite.com/picturingindians/book and using the code: GAF20 The Sovereign Bodies Institute: Sovereign Bodies Institute (SBI) builds on Indigenous traditions of data gathering and knowledge transfer to create, disseminate, and put into action research on gender and sexual violence against Indigenous people. SBI is committed to: conducting, supporting, and mobilizing culturally-informed and community-engaged research on gender and sexual violence against Indigenous people; uplifting Indigenous researchers, knowledge keepers, and data visualists in their work to discover and disseminate data on this violence [...]

Buzzkill Bookshelf – Liza Black, Picturing Indians: Native Americans in Film 1941-1960

Standing at the intersection of Native history, labor, and representation, Picturing Indians presents a vivid portrait of the complicated experiences of Native actors on the sets of midcentury Hollywood Westerns. This behind-the-scenes look at costuming, makeup, contract negotiations, and union disparities uncovers an all-too-familiar narrative of racism and further complicates filmmakers’ choices to follow mainstream representations of “Indianness.” Liza Black offers a rare and overlooked perspective on American cinema history by giving voice to creators of movie Indians—the stylists, public relations workers, and the actors themselves. In exploring the inherent racism in sensationalizing Native culture for profit, Black also chronicles the little-known attempts of studios to generate cultural authenticity and historical accuracy in their films. She discusses the studios’ need for actual Indians to participate [...]


 

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