Once a King: The Lost Memoir of Edward VIII

By Professor Buzzkill / April 16, 2024 / Comments Off on Once a King: The Lost Memoir of Edward VIII

Jane Marguerite Tippett discusses her new book about Edward VIII, the English king who abdicated the throne in 1936 for the woman he loved, the American socialite Wallis Simpson. She describes the complexity of his life and the almost innumerable myths about his political views, his hopes for the British monarchy, and his famous meeting…

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The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory

By Professor Buzzkill / April 9, 2024 / Comments Off on The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory

Professor Adam Domby explains why the Lost Cause of the Confederacy is full of fraud, fabrication, and white supremacy. And he analyzes how it is expressed in statuary, memory, and commemoration in the American South in the Jim Crow era. This is a complete examination of the Lost Cause and its destructive effect on American…

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The Press and Women Politicians from Victoria Woodhull to Kamala Harris: Encore Episode

By Professor Buzzkill / March 26, 2024 /

Professor Terri Finneman explains how the press has portrayed women politicians running for high office in the United States. From Victoria Woodhull in the 1870s to Kamala Harris in today, she enlightens us about how the media treatment of women politicians has and hasn’t changed over this long period! Encore Episode.— Buzzkill Bookshelf Teri Finneman,…

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The “Princess Qajar” Meme: Junk History and Conceptions of Beauty

By Professor Buzzkill / March 19, 2024 / Comments Off on The “Princess Qajar” Meme: Junk History and Conceptions of Beauty

Dr. Victoria Martinez joins to debunk and explain Junk history is embodied a viral meme that portrays a nineteenth-century Persian princess with facial hair, alongside the claim that 13 men killed themselves over their unrequited love for her. While it fails miserably at historical accuracy, the meme succeeds at demonstrating how easily viral clickbait obscures…

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Irish America: Race and Politics

By Professor Buzzkill / March 12, 2024 / Comments Off on Irish America: Race and Politics

Professor Mary Burke destroys the myths and caricatures of Irish Americans as a monolithic cultural, racial, and political group. Figures from the Scots-Irish Andrew Jackson to the Caribbean-Irish Rihanna, as well as literature, film, caricature, and beauty discourse, convey how the Irish racially transformed multiple times: in the slave-holding Caribbean, on America’s frontiers and antebellum…

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Who Said “Well-Behaved Women Rarely Make History”?

By Professor Buzzkill / March 6, 2024 / Comments Off on Who Said “Well-Behaved Women Rarely Make History”?

Lots of people are credited with coining the great phrase, “well-behaved women rarely make history.” They include Marilyn Monroe, Gloria Steinem, Eleanor Roosevelt, Anne Boleyn, and many more. Given time, any powerful woman with backbone and nerve will get credit for this phrase and sentiment. Even Princess Leila from “Star Wars” saying “well-behaved women rarely…

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Green Book Sites: Local History and Architecture

By Professor Buzzkill / March 5, 2024 /

We’ve already learned about the importance of “The Negro Motorist Green Book” from our previous show. Here, historians Catherine Zipf and Susan Hellman discuss their project on the architecture of the sites found in the Green Book and what various efforts are being made to locate more Green Book sites and preserve them. Perhaps the…

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Traveling While Black: The Green Book Guides to African-American Motoring

By Professor Buzzkill / February 25, 2024 /

20th-century automobile travel was supposed to represent freedom, but what else did it represent? Professor Cotten Seiler from Dickinson College joins us to discuss the difficulties and hazards of traveling in the United States faced by African-American motorists in the 20th Century, especially during the height of segregation and Jim Crow. Specifically, we learn how…

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Henry Kissinger Part 2: Perpetual Power?

By Professor Buzzkill / February 20, 2024 /

Professor Philip Nash joins us for Part 2 of our examination of the life and loves of Henry Kissinger, perhaps the most influential American foreign policy figure of the later Cold War. This episode discusses his time in power in the Nixon administration, his carefully crafted public image, and his continuing power after he left…

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Henry Kissinger Part 1: Meteoric Rise

By Professor Buzzkill / February 6, 2024 / Comments Off on Henry Kissinger Part 1: Meteoric Rise

Professor Philip Nash joins us for Part 1 of our examination of the life and loves of Henry Kissinger, perhaps the most influential American foreign policy figure of the later Cold War. We look at his origins, his education, his move into governing circles, and his meteoric rise to power in the 1970s. An amazing…

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