June 2020

D.H. Akenson, If the Irish Ran the World: Montserrat, 1630-1730

By |2020-06-24T13:33:39-04:00June 24th, 2020|Bookshelf|

Akenson provides compelling insights into whether ethnicity was central to the making of the colonial world and the usefulness of studies of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English imperialism in the Americas.

Comments Off on D.H. Akenson, If the Irish Ran the World: Montserrat, 1630-1730

Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink

By |2020-06-22T17:31:34-04:00June 22nd, 2020|Bookshelf|

The rise of Hong Kong is the story of a miraculous post-War boom, when Chinese refugees flocked to a small British colony, and, in less than fifty years, transformed it into one of the great [...]

Comments Off on Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Vigil: Hong Kong on the Brink

Adam H. Domby, The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory

By |2020-06-16T21:18:29-04:00June 16th, 2020|Bookshelf|

The Lost Cause ideology that emerged after the Civil War and flourished in the early twentieth century in essence sought to recast a struggle to perpetuate slavery as a heroic defense of the South. As [...]

Comments Off on Adam H. Domby, The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory

Damien Lewis, Churchill’s Shadow Raiders: The Race to Develop Radar, World War II’s Invisible Secret Weapon

By |2020-06-16T12:24:01-04:00June 16th, 2020|Bookshelf|

In the winter of 1941, as Britain faced defeat on all fronts, an RAF reconnaissance pilot photographed an alien-looking object on the French coast near Le Havre. The mysterious device—a “Wurzburg Dish”—appeared to be a [...]

Comments Off on Damien Lewis, Churchill’s Shadow Raiders: The Race to Develop Radar, World War II’s Invisible Secret Weapon

Ty Seidule, Robert E. Lee and Me: A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause

By |2020-06-15T12:40:27-04:00June 15th, 2020|Bookshelf|

In a forceful but humane narrative, former soldier and head of the West Point history department Ty Seidule's Robert E. Lee and Me challenges the myths and lies of the Confederate legacy―and explores why some [...]

Comments Off on Ty Seidule, Robert E. Lee and Me: A Southerner’s Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause

Martha S. Jones, Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All

By |2020-06-10T14:14:32-04:00June 10th, 2020|Bookshelf|

The epic history of African American women's pursuit of political power -- and how it transformed America. In the standard story, the suffrage crusade began in Seneca Falls in 1848 and ended with the ratification [...]

Comments Off on Martha S. Jones, Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All

Martin Luther King and James M. Washington (ed) A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches

By |2020-06-10T14:22:15-04:00June 2nd, 2020|Bookshelf|

These words and others are commemorated here in the only major one-volume collection of this seminal twentieth-century American prophet's writings, speeches, interviews, and autobiographical reflections. A Testament of Hope contains Martin Luther King, Jr.'s essential [...]

Comments Off on Martin Luther King and James M. Washington (ed) A Testament of Hope: The Essential Writings and Speeches

Michelle Goldberg, Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism

By |2020-06-10T14:20:07-04:00June 1st, 2020|Bookshelf|

In Kingdom Coming, Goldberg demonstrates how an increasingly bellicose fundamentalism is gaining traction throughout our national life, taking us on a tour of the parallel right-wing evangelical culture that is buoyed by Republican political patronage. [...]

Comments Off on Michelle Goldberg, Kingdom Coming: The Rise of Christian Nationalism

May 2020

Ellen Marie Wiseman, The Orphan Collector

By |2020-06-10T14:17:33-04:00May 29th, 2020|Bookshelf|

A powerful tale of upheaval, resilience and hope set in Philadelphia during the 1918 Spanish Flu outbreak—the deadly pandemic that went on to infect one-third of the world’s population… In the fall of 1918, thirteen-year-old [...]

Comments Off on Ellen Marie Wiseman, The Orphan Collector